CHAPTER FIFTEEN Game

BRAISED

1. Partridge

2. Pheasant

PASTRY COVERED

3. Game pie

4. Pigeon pie

5. Rabbit pie

6. Veal and ham pie

ROAST

7. Grouse

8. Hare

9. Partridge

10. Pheasant

11. Pigeon 

12. Snipe

13. Venison

14. Wild duck

15. Woodcock

SAUTE

16. Pheasant with various garnishes

STEW

17. Hare, jugged

18. Rabbit fricasse

19. Game salmis

20. Vitners stew

TERRINE

21. Game

The Art of Game

INTRODUCTION

1. Game is the term applied to wild animals and birds which are hunted and eaten. Game feeds on food not available to farm reared animals and birds, this gives it its distinctive flavour. In Britain there is a close season when most game is protected by law and hunting is forbidden. Rabbit, pigeons and quail are not protected by law and are available fresh throughout the year.

2. Before it is ready for cooking most game should be hung in order to tenderise the flesh and develop the flavour. However, it is not necessary to hang game until it is "high" (slightly decomposed). Feathered game is not plucked or drawn before being hung. Hares are hung without being skinned or the entrails removed. It is difficult to give exact times for hanging game as much depends on the type of game, its age, the weather and individual tastes. Game will mature more quickly in warm humid weather than in cold dry weather. As a guide, game should be hung in a place which is cool and dry, well ventilated and fly and insect proof. In warm weather it is sensible to hang game in a refrigerated cold room where the temperature can be maintained at between 2°C and 5°C.

3. It is important that game is hung in such a way that air can circulate freely around it otherwise there is the chance that touching parts will decompose and the game become unfit for consumption. For this reason birds should not be hung in pairs.

4. Feathered game is hung by the neck and is ready for cooking when the feathers on the lower part of its body near the vent can be easily plucked out. If the flesh in this area has a green or bluish discolouration the bird has been hung too long.

5. Furred game is hung by the legs. Hares should be suspended over a bowl in order to collect any blood which may drip. This is used to thicken the sauce.

6. All game is lean and in consequence tends to be dry if not provided with additional fat to keep it most during cooking. This can take several forms:

a. Barding the breast of birds with a layer of backfat.

b. Larding venison with strips of backfat.

c. Marinading joints of venison or hare overnight.

7. It is a matter of personal choice whether to serve game rare or well cooked. As a general rule game benefits from being served slightly underdone. If over-cooked it becomes tough and dry.

The Art of Game

BRAISED

1. BRAISED PARTRIDGE WITH CABBAGE

8 PORTIONS

Ingredients

Partridges                                                             4

Cabbage                                                               1.6 kg

Carrots                                                                 200 g

Frankfurter sausages                                            8

Streaky bacon                                                      200 g

Bouquet garni                                                      1 small

Onions                                                                   100 g

White stock                                                          750 ml

Demi-glace                                                          500 ml

Cloves                                                                        6

Salt

Pepper

Parsley

Method

1. Prepare the partridges. Peel the onions and stud them with cloves.

2. Peel and shred the cabbage and carrots. Blanch the cabbage, onion, carrot, bacon and sausages for 5 minutes then refresh and drain.

3. Roast the partridge in a hot oven 220°C for 10 minutes.

4. Line a braising pan with cabbage and place the birds, bacon, sausages, carrots, onions and the bouquet garni in the centre and cover with the remainder of the cabbage.

5. Three parts cover with stock.

6. Cover with a paper and lid, bring to the boil and braise slowly for one hour until the birds are tender.

7. Turn out the contents onto a sieve, cut the partridges in half. Remove the spine and breast bones.

8. Slice the bacon, and keep hot.

9. Arrange the cabbage in an oval dish, place the partridges on top and with carrot, sausages and bacon.

10. Garnish with chopped parsley and surround with a little of the sauce. Serve the remainder of the sauce in a sauceboat.

Notes:

1. Like all game birds, partridges need to be hung or they will be tough and tasteless. Old birds should be hung for 5 days.

2. They are in season 1 September to 1 February.

3. Almost all pheasant recipes may be used in preparing partridges.

2. BRAISED PHEASANT WITH CABBAGE

8 PORTIONS

Ingredients

Pheasant                                                                 2

Carrots                                                                 200 g

Frankfurter sausages                                            8

Streaky bacon                                                      200 g

Bouquet garni                                                      1 small

Cabbage                                                                 1.6 kg

Onions                                                                    100 g

White stock                                                           750 ml

Demi-glace                                                           500 ml

Cloves 6

Salt

Pepper

Parsley

Method

1. Prepare the pheasants. Peel the onions and stud them with cloves.

2. Clean and shred the cabbage and carrots.

3. Blanch the cabbage, onion, carrot, bacon and sausages for 5 minutes then refresh and drain.

4. Roast the pheasants in a hot oven 220°C for 15 minutes.

5. Line a braising pan with cabbage and place the birds, bacon, sausages, carrots, onions and the bouquet garni in the centre and cover with the remainder of the cabbage.

6. Three parts cover with stock.

7. Cover with a paper and lid, bring to the boil and braise slowly for approximately 1½ hours until the birds are tender.

8. Turn out the contents onto a sieve, carve each of the pheasants into portions.

9. Slice the bacon and keep hot.

10. Arrange the cabbage in an oval dish, place the pheasant on top and garnish with the carrots, sausages and bacon.

11. Garnish with chopped parsley and surround with a little sauce. Serve the remainder of sauce in a sauceboat.

Notes:

1. Pheasants are usually sold by the brace, ie a cock and a hen. The distinctive feature of the cock pheasant is the shape of its tail which is longer than the whole of its body and its neck feathers which are iridescent and shot with blue and green. The hen on the other hand has a short tail and is dull brown in colour. Hen birds are more juicy and tender.

2. Only the young birds should be roasted, old birds should be braised or used for game pies or stock.

PASTRY COVERED

3. GAME PIE

8 PORTIONS

Ingredients

Hare (saddle and legs)                                         600 g

Lean pork                                                             200 g

Fat pork                                                                200 g

Back fat                                                                 200 g

Madeira                                                                150 ml

Brandy                                                                  75 ml

Raised pie pastry                                                800 g

Egg wash                                                                  1

Bay leaf                                                                     1

Game jelly                                                            500 ml

Salt

Pepper

Spice

Method

1. Prepare a firm pie pastry.

2. Grease a raised pie mould and place it onto a baking sheet.

3. Line the mould with two-thirds of the paste and then line the pastry with thin slices of back fat.

4. Bone the hare and remove the fillets. Flatten them out 25 mm square then roll them up in small slices of back fat and place to one side.

5. Remove any sinews, then mince the remainder of the flesh, the pork and half the back fat through a fine plate 3 times.

6. Mix all the ingredients together adding the Madeira, brandy and seasoning and then pass the mixture through a sieve.

7. Place half the mixture into the prepared mould and arrange the small fillet rolls neatly onto the filling, then cover with the remaining mixture.

8. Cover the surface with the remaining back fat and place a small bay leaf on top.

9. Cover the pie with the remainder of the pastry and seal the edges.

10. Egg wash and decorate the top make a small hole in the centre and insert a funnel of greaseproof paper to allow the steam to escape during cooking.

11. Allow to stand for one hour in a cool place, then egg wash again and bake in a moderate oven 190°C for 2½ hours.

12. Remove from the oven and carefully fill with warm game jelly.

13. Allow to cool and set. Remove the mould and brush the pastry over with game jelly to moisten the crust slightly and glaze the pie.

Note: The following game can be used in place of the hare:

Pheasant: Two young hens or one large old hen.

Partridge: Four old birds.

Grouse: Three old birds.

4. PIGEON PIE

8 PORTIONS

Ingredients

Beef                                                                      400 g

Onions                                                                  50 g

Parsley  (chopped)

Mushrooms                                                          100 g

Pigeon breasts                                                      4

Streaky bacon                                                      200 g

Brown stock                                                         500 ml

Puff pastry                                                           200 g

Egg                                                                          1

Salt

Pepper

Method

1. Dice the beef, peel and finely chop the onions and parsley. Slice the mushrooms. Cut each of the pigeon breasts into 4 and wrap each piece in a rasher of bacon.

2. Arrange in a pie dish, add onion, parsley, mushrooms and beef. Season with salt and pepper.

3. Pour over the brown stock.

4. Cover with puff pastry, egg wash and cook in an oven at 180°C for 2½ hours.

5. RABBIT PIE

8 PORTIONS

Ingredients

Rabbit                                                                   1.2 kg

Button mushrooms                                              75 g

Onions                                                                  60 g

Parsley                                                                   5 g

Streaky bacon                                                      250 g

Brown stock                                                         250 ml

Puff pastry                                                           200 g

Pepper

Method

1. Cut the rabbit into joints.

2. Slice the mushrooms and finely chop the onions and parsley. Roll a slice of bacon around each piece of rabbit and place in a pie dish.

3. Cover with the mushrooms, parsley and onions. Season and half cover with stock.

4. Roll out the pastry 5 mm thick, cover the pie, egg wash and cook in an oven at 180°C for 2 hours.

VEAL AND HAM PIE

Ingredients

Raised pie pastry                                                  750 g

Veal boneless                                                        400 g

Gammon rashers                                                  100 g

Streaky bacon rashers                                          100 g

Eggs                                                                           5

Onions                                                                     50 g

Oil                                                                           25 ml

Parsley (chopped)                                                  5 g

Aspic jelly                                                            250 ml

Method

1. Hard boil 4 of the eggs. Refresh and remove the shells. Peel and finely chop the onion. Cook in the oil without colouring and allow to cool.

2. Cut the veal and gammon rashers into scallops.

3. Grease a raised pie mould.

4. Roll out two-thirds of the pie pastry 5 mm thick and line the mould with the pastry. Line the paste with streaky bacon allowing the bacon to overlap the sides by 5 cm. Half fill the mould with alternating layers of seasoned veal and gammon. Sprinkle with parsley and onion.

5. Place the hard boiled eggs along the centre and continue layering with the veal, gammon, parsley and onion into the mould until it is full.

6. Fold in the streaky bacon to cover the surface. Egg wash the top edges of the pastry. Roll out the remaining pastry and cover the pie. Egg wash and allow to rest for one hour.

7. Bake in an oven 220°C for 15 minutes to set the paste, reduce the heat to 180°C and continue to bake slowly for 2½ hours. Remove the pie from the oven and allow to cool, fill with warm aspic jelly for 15 minutes.

8. Allow to go cold and then refrigerate for an hour before removing from the mould.

Note: If a raised pie mould is not available a sandwich loaf tin can be used. It should be lined with greaseproof paper before lining with paste to facilitate the removal of the cooked pie.

ROAST

7. ROAST GROUSE

8 PORTIONS

Ingredients

Young grouse                                                           4

Oil                                                                          125 ml

Back fat                                                                4 slices

Game stock                                                          250 ml

Bread                                                                    8 slices

Shallots                                                                   25 g

White breadcrumbs                                              75 g

Butter                                                                      75 g

Watercress                                                            100 g

Game chips                                                           100 g

Bread sauce                                                          200 ml

Parsley (chopped)

Method

1. Clean the grouse, saving the liver. The feet should be trimmed and need to be covered with greaseproof paper during cooking. Winglets are cut off at the first joint.

2. Place a little salt inside the cavity and cover the breasts with a thin slice of back fat tied on loosely.

3. Place the birds into a roasting dish on their sides, baste with oil and place into a hot oven 250°C for 5 minutes.

4. Turn the birds over onto their other sides and roast for a further 5 minutes.

5. turn the birds onto their backs and continue to roast for 4 minutes then remove the back fat and colour the breasts. The whole process should not exceed 20 minutes as grouse ideally are served slightly underdone.

6. Remove the birds from the pan. Sprinkle with a little salt and keep warm. Strain off the surplus fat from the dish retaining as much of the cooking residue as possible and use this with the game stock to make a roast gravy.

7. Cut the bread into croutons 50 mm square and shallow fry them to a golden brown.

8. Peel and finely chop the shallots and cook them without colouring in a little oil.

9. Saute the livers, mix them with the shallots and pass through a coarse sieve then mix the parsley and seasoning.

10. Spread a little of this mixture on the fried croutons and reheat in the oven.

11. Fry the white breadcrumbs in the butter to a golden brown.

12. Cut each bird in half, remove the spine and breast bones and place each portion into a crouton on the serving dish which should be garnished with the game chips and watercress.

13. Serve the gravy, bread sauce and the fried breadcrumbs in sauce boats separately.

Note: It is not necessary to hang grouse prior to cooking.

8. ROAST SADDLE OF HARE

10 PORTIONS

Ingredients

Hare                                                                  5 saddles

Back fat                                                                200 g

Onion                                                                    50 g

Carrot                                                                   50 g

Bouquet garni                                                       1

Oil                                                                       60 ml

Red wine                                                           250 ml

Reforme sauce                                                 250 ml

Salt

Method

1. Prepare the saddle by removing the outside shin and gristle and larding the meat with strips of back fat. Sprinkle with a little salt.

2. Make a marinade with the carrots, onion, bouquet garni, oil and red wine. Add the hare and marinade in a cool place for 24 hours.

3. Remove the hare from the marinade and dry with a clean cloth.

4. Roast in an oven 220°C until slightly undercooked.

5. Cut the saddle in half. Serve with reforme sauce.

9. ROAST PARTRIDGE

10 PORTIONS

Ingredients

Young partridges                                                 10

Back fat                                                                250 g

Oil                                                                         100 g

Game stock                                                        250 ml

Parsley (chopped)

Shallots                                                                30 g

Bread                                                                    5 slices

White breadcrumbs                                              75 g

Butter                                                                      75 g

Watercress                                                            1 bunch

Game chips                                                           100 g

Bread sauce                                                          250 ml

Salt

Pepper

Method

1. Clean the partridges saving the livers. Sprinkle the cavities with a little salt and cover the breast with thin slices of back fat and loosely tied on.

2. Place the birds in a roasting dish on their backs, baste with oil and roast in an oven at 200°C for 20 minutes. Remove the back fat and cook for a further 5 minutes to colour the breast.

3. Remove the birds from the oven and keep warm.

4. Strain off the surplus fat from the dish retaining as much of the residue as possible and use this with the game stick to make a roast gravy.

5. Peel and chop the shallots and cook without colouring in a little oil.

6. Saute the partridge livers, mix them with the shallots and pass them through a coarse sieve then mix in the chopped parsley and seasoning. Cut the bread into croutons 50 mm square and shallow fry to a golden brown.

7. Spread a little of the liver mixture on each crouton and reheat in the oven.

8. Shallow fry the white breadcrumbs in the butter until golden brown.

9. Place a bird on each crouton and serve on a dish garnished with game chips and watercress.

10. The gravy, bread sauce and fried breadcrumbs are served in sauce-boats separately.

Note: Partridges need to be hung or they will be tough and tasteless. Allow 4 days for young birds and 5-6 days for older ones.

10. ROAST PHEASANT

9 PORTIONS

Ingredients

Young pheasants                                                    3

Back fat                                                                 200 g

Oil                                                                          50 ml

Game stock                                                          250 ml

White breadcrumbs                                              75 g

Butter                                                                      75 g

Watercress                                                            1 bunch

Bread sauce                                                          200 ml

Game chips                                                            90 g

Pepper

Method

1. Clean the pheasants. The feet should be trimmed and need to be covered with greaseproof paper during cooking. Winglets are cut off at the first joint.

2. Sprinkle the cavities with a little salt and cover the breast with thin slices of back fat loosely tied on.

3. Place the birds into a roasting dish on their sides. Baste with oil and place into an oven at 220°C for 15 minutes. Turn the birds over on to the other side and roast for a further 15 minutes.

4. Turn the birds onto their backs and continue roasting for 10 minutes. Remove the back fat and allow the breast to colour. The whole process should not exceed 45 minutes.

5. Strain off the surplus fat from the dish retaining as much residue as possible and use this with the game stock to make a roast gravy.

6. Fry the white breadcrumbs in the butter to a golden brown.

7. Cut each bird into 3 portions and serve garnished with watercress and game chips. The gravy, bread sauce and fried breadcrumbs are served in sauceboats separately.

11. ROAST PIGEON

10 PORTIONS

Ingredients

Pigeons                                                                     1

Back fat                                                                  200 g

Oil                                                                           50 ml

Brown stock                                                          250 ml

Watercress                                                            1 bunch

Game chips                                                           100 g

Bread sauce                                                          250 ml

Salt

Pepper

Method

1. Clean the pigeon as for poultry. The feet are not cut off but are scalded and scraped.

2. Cover the breast with thin slices of back fat tied on loosely.

3. Place the birds in a roasting tin on their sides and roast in an oven at 220°C for 10 minutes.

4. Turn the birds over onto their other sides and roast for 10 minutes.

5. Turn the birds on their backs and roast for a further 5 minutes then remove the back fat to allow the breasts to colour.

6. Remove them from the pan, sprinkle lightly with salt and keep warm.

7. Strain off any surplus fat retaining as much of the residue as possible and use this with the brown stock to make a roast gravy.

8. Cut the bread into croutons 50 mm square and fry in oil to a golden brown.

9. Cut the pigeons in half, remove the backbones and serve garnished with watercress on a warm dish.

10. Serve the bread sauce and roast gravy in a sauceboat separately.

Notes:

1. Tame and wild pigeons may be eaten. Those commer-cially reared for the table are classed as poultry. Wild or wood pigeons are classified as game.

2. Young pigeons about one month old are known as squab. Allow one bird per person.

12. SNIPE

10 PORTIONS

Ingredients

Snipe                                                                       10

Bacon rashers                                                      200 g

Bread                                                                    5 slices

White breadcrumbs                                              75 g

Butter                                                                      75 g

Watercress                                                            1 bunch

Bread sauce                                                          250 ml

Game chips                                                           100 g

Salt

Pepper

Method

1. Prepare the woodcocks by removing the gizzards and the eyes. The intestines being the most delicate part, are not drawn.

2. Truss the birds by bringing the feet together and using the beak to fix them to the body. Cover the breasts with a thin slice of bacon.

3. Toast the bread on both sides and cut into croutons 50 mm square.

4. Place the birds on the croutons and roast them in an oven at 220°C for 10 minutes.

5. Shallow fry the white breadcrumbs in the butter to a golden brown.

6. When the birds are cooked remove them from the oven, take out the entrails and spread them on the croutons.

7. Replace the snipe on the croutons and serve in a dish garnished with the game chips and watercress.

8. The bread sauce and fried breadcrumbs are served in sauce-boats separately.

Note: Snipe are best hung for 3-5 days. They are in season from 12 August to 31 January.

VENISON

Quality and Buying

1. Venison is the name given to the meat of the deer family and is quite unmistakable. It is a very fine textured, dense, dark red meat which has little external natural fat and little marbling evident in the flesh. What fat there is will be white and firm in a young animal and yellow in an older more mature one. Venison is normally sold already jointed and a wide variety of fresh or deep frozen cuts are available throughout the year.

Hanging

2. Venison from older deer is the most popular because it has had time to develop and buck or stag venison is considered to be the best for flavour. Younger deer have a less "gamey" flavour but will provide a more tender meat, particularly in the choicest cuts. After skinning and cleaning, the animal is hung to develop more fully the distinctive, rich flavour of the meat and to aid the tenderising process. Hanging times will depend on the species, the age of the animal, the weather and the time of year and also personal taste. A young beast may be hung for up to a week or even eaten fresh, while an older one may be hung for up to 10 days, or longer of desired. Because red deer has especially lean meat with a full flavour, it requires a longer hanging time than fallow and roe deer, which both require less time.

Preparation and Cooking

3. Venison carries little natural fat and can be dry and tough. It is important in such cases that additional moisture and flavour is introduced by marinading the meat before cooking. This particularly applies to joints for roasting and braising. Marinading can take place for a period of 4 hours to 3 days, or longer, according to personal taste.

4. This will continue the tenderising process started during hanging, introduce moisture to the meat and help to develop its full flavour. Before marinading, care should be taken to remove all traces of fat as these will spoil the flavour of the meat. A suitable marinade may be made from red wine, port or a good quality wine vinegar and, preferably, olive oil, although most oils will be suitable. To this may be added any of the following: herbs, spices, juniper berries, bay leaves, parsley stalks, garlic, peppercorns and cleaned and chopped root vegetables: celery, onion and carrot. To ensure the joint is evenly treated and to prevent drying out, it should be turned occasionally during the marinading process.

5. As with all game, the meat of older animals will need slow cooking whereas the meat of young animals lends itself to frying and grilling. After marinading, joints for roasting may be larded with strips of pork back fat inserted into the joint at intervals with a larding needle. Because the meat is very lean, larding will aid the cooking process and add flavour. Like all meats, the various parts of the animal will require different preparation and treatment and the following chart lists the requirements and uses by joint:

Saddle/Loin Joints, first class roasting. Fillet: cut into medallions, grill or fry. Loin: cut into chops, grill or fry.

Leg or Haunch Joints, first class roasting, first class braising.

Shoulder Boned Joint, braising, baking, roasting. Diced: stewing, braising. Minced: use as an alternative to beef mince for chilli etc.

Flank Minced/Diced, stewing.

Neck: Cutlets, braising, baking.

13. ROAST VENISON

10 PORTIONS

Ingredients

Hunch or leg of venison                                        2 kg

Back fat                                                                   200 g

Onion                                                                       50 g

Celery                                                                      50 g

Carrot                                                                      50 g

Oil                                                                           150 ml

Red wine                                                                250 ml

Bouquet garni                                                          1

Salt

Poivrade sauce                                                      250 ml

Method

1. Prepare the haunch or leg by removing all the sinews, gristle and fat.

2. Lard the meat with strips of back fat.

3. Prepare a marinade with the carrots, onions, celery, bouquet garni, red wine and 75 ml of oil. Add the venison and marinade in a cool place for 3 days.

4. Remove the venison from the marinade and dry with a clean cloth.

5. Lightly season the joint then apply a generous coating of oil. Wrap the joint in tin foil.

6. Roast in an oven at 190°C for 50 minutes. Remove the tin foil and continue to roast for a further 15 minutes to colour the outside of the joint.

7. Carve slices from the joint and serve with poivrade sauce.

Notes:

1. The timings given for roasting will given an underdone finish to the joint. Increase the time by a further 5 minutes per kilo for a more well cooked joint.

2. Further suitable sauces and garnishes that may be served with this dish are: redcurrant jelly or apple sauce, puree of chestnuts, braised red cabbage and creamed potatoes.

3. Saddle of venison may also be used in this recipe although, if using venison from a young deer, do not marinade as this will impair the delicate flavour of the meat. Allow 2 kg of saddle of venison for 10 portions and for an underdone finish reduce the cooking time by 5 minutes per kg. Garnish using any of the garnishes described above.

14. ROAST WILD DUCK

Mallard, Teal and Widgeon are the most common types of wild duck available in Britain. Living on the coast or in marshy areas, the flesh of wild ducks tends to be rather oily. As a result the flesh turns rancid if the fowl are left to hand too long. Therefore, they should not be hung for more than 2 to 3 days. Wild ducks are in season from 1 September to 31 January. Only young birds should be roasted.

MALLARD

The mallard is the largest and most common wild duck and yields approximately 3 portions. Roast for 30 minutes at 220°C.

TEAL

Teal is the smallest of the 3 averaging 35 cm in length and weighing approximately 300 g. Allow one per portion. Roast for 20 minutes at 220°C.

WIDGEON

Widgeon is roughly between a mallard and teal in size and will serve 2. Roast at 220°C for 30 minutes. All 3 are served with watercress and wedges of lemon.

15. ROAST WOODCOCK

10 PORTIONS

Ingredients

Woodcocks                                                              10

Bacon rashers                                                       200 g

Bread                                                                    5 slices

White breadcrumbs                                               75 g

Butter                                                                       75 g

Watercress                                                            1 bunch

Bread sauce                                                          250 ml

Game chips                                                           100 g

Salt

Pepper

Method

1. Prepare the woodcocks by removing the gizzards and the eyes. The intestines being the most delicate part are not drawn.

2. Truss the birds by bringing the feet together and using the beak to fix them to the body, cover the breasts with a thin slice of bacon.

3. Toast the bread on both sides and cut into croutons 50 mm square.

4. Place the bird on the croutons and roast them in a hot oven for 20 minutes.

5. Shallow fry the breadcrumbs in the butter to a golden brown.

6. When the birds are cooked remove them from the oven, take out the entrails and spread them on the crouton.

7. Replace the woodcocks on the crouton and serve on a warm dish. Garnish with game chips and watercress.

8. The bread sauce and fried breadcrumbs are served in sauce-boats separately.

Notes:

1. Woodcocks are best hung for 3 to 5 days.

2. They are in season from 1 October to 31 January or in Scotland 1 September to 31 January.

SAUTE

16. SUPREME OF PHEASANT

10 PORTIONS

Ingredients

Young pheasants                                                    5

Butter                                                                     100 g

White wine                                                            100 ml

Game stock                                                            50 ml

Method

1. Remove the supremes as for chickens, saving the legs for salmis or game pies.

2. Season the supremes and saute them in butter leaving them slightly under-cooked.

3. Remove the supremes from the pan and keep warm.

4. Deglace the pan with white wine, add a little game stock reduce by one third add the butter and allow it to just melt. Pour the sauce over the supremes.

Notes:

1. If supremes are over-cooked they will be dry so are best kept slightly underdone.

2. As an alternative the pheasant can be roasted whole, keeping the breast slightly underdone the supremes being removed just prior to service.

3. Most garnishes used for chicken supremes can be used for pheasant supremes. However, because the pheasant breast tends to dry out the following list of garnishes, sufficient for 10 portions are more appropriate.

Archidue: Saute the supremes, remove from the pan and keep hot. Deglace the pan with 25 ml sherry, 25 ml port wine and 25 ml whisky. Reduce by one third add 125 ml cream and 125 ml chicken veloute combined with 100 g brunoise of vegetable and truffle. Bring to the boil and pour over the supremes.

Mushrooms: Saute the supremes, remove them from the pan and keep hot. Add 100 g sliced mushrooms to the pan and cook gently. Deglace the pan with Madeira and 100 ml game stock. Reduce by one third. Add 100 g butter, allow the butter to melt and then pour the sauce over the supremes.

Orange: Saute the supremes, remove them from the pan and keep hot. Deglace the pan with 25 ml brandy. Add the juice of 2 lemons and 150 ml of orange juice. Bring to the boil and pour the sauce over the supremes. Variations of the above can be prepared using pineapple juice or tangerine juice in place of orange juice.

Smitane Saute the supremes, remove them from the pan and keep hot. Add 100 g of finely chopped shallots and allow to cook without colouring. Deglace the pan with 200 ml of white wine and 75 ml of veal stock. Reduce by one third. Add 125 ml sour cream and the juice of one lemon. Bring to the boil, mask the sauce over supremes and serve decorated with chopped parsley.

Truffle: Saute the supremes, remove them from the pan and keep hot. Add 25 g of truffle to the pan and cook gently. Deglace the pan with Madeira and 100 ml game stock. Reduce by one third, add 100 g butter, allow the butter to melt and then pour the sauce over the supremes.

STEW

17. JUGGED HARE

10 PORTIONS

Ingredients

Hares                                                                    2x1.6 kg

Onion                                                                     50 g

Carrot                                                                    50 g

Olive oil                                                                150 ml

Red wine                                                               150 ml

Streaky bacon                                                       200 g

Flour                                                                       50 g

Brown stock                                                         500 ml

Bouquet garni                                                        1 small

Glazed button onions                                            100 g

Mushrooms                                                             100 g

Redcurrant jelly                                                       50 g

Port wine                                                                150 ml

Bread                                                                     5 slices

Butter                                                                     100 g

Parsley (chopped)

Salt

Pepper

Method

1. Skin the hares taking care not to cut into the belly.

2. Carefully slit open the belly and remove the entrails.

3. Cut into the diaphragm the membrane separating the chest cavity from the abdomen, remove the blood and retain it in a basin. See Notes.

4. Cut the hare into 75 g pieces and place in a basin.

5. Peel and slice the carrot and onion and add to the hare.

6. Add the red wine, olive oil, bouquet garni and seasoning.

7. Cover the basin and allow to marinade in a cool place for at least 24 hours turning regularly.

8. Cut the bacon into lardons. Shallow fry and drain.

9. Drain the marinade and retain.

10. Shallow fry the hare, onion and carrots until lightly coloured.

11. Add the flour and cook slowly until golden brown.

12. Moisten with the marinade and sufficient stock to form a light sauce. Add the lardons of bacon.

13. Bring to the boil stirring occasionally. Cover with a lid and cook on a low heat or in a slow oven until tender.

14. Cut the bread into heart shaped croutons and fry them to a golden brown in the butter.

15. Scallop the mushrooms and cook them in a little acidulated water.

16. When the hare is cooked turn it out onto a sieve. Place the pieces of hare, lardons of bacon, mushrooms and glazed button onions into a casserole and keep warm.

17. Strain the sauce, remove the fat and reduce it until it lightly coats the back of a spoon.

18. Remove from the heat and stir in the blood, ensuring that it does not boil or the sauce will curdle.

19. Adjust the seasoning and add the redcurrant jelly and port wine.

20. Strain the sauce through a muslin over the hare.

21. Garnish with the heart shaped croutons with the points dipped in the sauce and then into chopped parsley.

Notes:

1. There is no closed season for hares, although they are best between October and February.

2. Hares are hung by the hind legs without the entrails being removed for between 3 and 5 days.

3. The blood collects in the chest cavity and care should be taken when removing the entrails not to damage the diaphragm.

4. To prevent the blood coagulating, add 5 ml of vinegar. Covered it should keep for up to 3 days in a refrigerator.

18. FRICASSE OF RABBIT

10 PORTIONS

Ingredients

Rabbit (prepared)                                                  1.2 kg

Butter                                                                      100 g

Flour                                                                        100 g

Veal or chicken stock                                            1.5 ltr

Bouquet garni                                                        1 small

Button onions 150 g

Button mushrooms                                                125 g

Lemon                                                                          1

Bread                                                                     5 slices

Oil                                                                           50 ml

Cream                                                                    75 ml

Egg                                                                               1

Parsley (chopped)

Salt

Pepper

Method

1. Cut the rabbit into joints, blanch, refresh and drain. Peel the onion.

2. Melt the butter in a saucepan, add the rabbit and fry lightly without colouring. Remove the meat from the pan. Add the flour and cook to a sandy texture, add the boiling stock slowly and combine into a smooth white sauce. Place the meat back into the sauce, add the bouquet garni and simmer for 30 minutes. Add the onions and cook until they are tender.

3. Wash and peel the mushrooms, cut into scallops. Place in a saucepan with a little lemon juice, seasoning, a knob of butter and a little water. Bring to the boil and simmer for 5 minutes. Drain the rabbit and onions from the sauce and keep warm.

4. Strain the sauce and reduce to coat the back of a spoon.

5. Cut the bread into heart shaped croutons and fry in the oil.

6. Mix the egg yolk and cream together, add a little sauce to this to bring to moderate temperature. Add this liaison to the sauce and whisk together. Do not boil after this stage or the sauce will curdle.

7. Add all the ingredients together and re-heat carefully. Serve decorated with the heart shaped croutons partly dipped in the sauce and then in the chopped parsley.

19. SALMIS OF GAME

8 PORTIONS

Ingredients

Cooked pheasants                                                2

Carrot                                                                   50 g

Onion                                                                    50 g

Oil                                                                         50 ml

Red wine                                                            250 ml

Brown stock                                                       125 ml

Demi glace                                                         250 ml

Button mushrooms                                          200 g

Lemon                                                                   1

Glazed button onions                                        150 g

Bread                                                                    4 slices

Parsley

Salt

Pepper

Method

1. Carve the pheasants as for roast chicken.

2. Peel and roughly chop the carrot and onion.

3. Chop up the carcass and fry it with the carrot and onion.

4. Remove the surplus oil, cover the carcass with the red wine and stock and bring to the boil.

5. Add the demi glace and simmer for 2 hours.

6. Wash and peel the mushrooms, cut them into scallops. Place in a saucepan with a little water. Bring to the boil and simmer for 5 minutes.

7. Pass the sauce through a fine strainer.

8. Boil the sauce and adjust the consistency to cover the back of a spoon.

9. Place the portions of pheasant, mushrooms and button onions in a casserole or deep serving dish, cover with a lid and heat through.

10. Cut the bread into heart shaped croutons and fry in the oil.

11. Pour the sauce over the pheasants, reheat but do not boil.

12. Garnish with the heart shaped croutons with the points dipped in sauce and chopped parsley.

Notes:

1. Partridge can also be used for this dish. In which case the partridges are cut in half lengthways.

2. Allow 4 partridges for this number of portions.

20. VITNERS STEW

10 PORTIONS

Ingredients

Hares                                                                    2x1.6 kg

Red burgundy                                                      500 ml

Oil                                                                          300 ml

Garlic                                                                     1 clove

Thyme                                                                  2 sprigs

Carrot                                                                    100 g

Onion                                                                     100 g

Flour                                                                       100 g

Beef stock                                                             500 ml

Glazed button onions                                           100 g

Button mushrooms                                              100 g

Salt pork fat                                                            50 g

Salt

Pepper

Parsley (chopped)

Black pepper

Bread                                                                    5 slices

Butter                                                                    100 g

Method

1. Prepare a marinade with the wine, 200 ml of oil, crushed garlic, 2 sprigs of thyme, 2 sprigs of parsley and salt and pepper.

2. Peel and slice the carrot and onion and add to the marinade.

3. Skin the hare and remove the entrails.

4. Cut the hare into pieces and marinade for 2 days, turning regularly.

5. Remove the hare from the marinade and dry the excess moisture with a clean cloth.

6. Season with ground black pepper and salt, dust with flour and saute in 100 ml of oil to a golden brown.

7. Pour off the excess oil and add the marinade, beef stock and sufficient wine to cover the hare.

8. Bring to the boil, skim and simmer for 1½ hours.

9. Cut the salt pork fat into lardons and saute until lightly cooked.

10. Place the hare in a casserole and keep hot.

11. Skim the sauce and adjust the seasoning.

12. Add the pieces of hare, button mushrooms, glazed button onions and lardons. Cook for a further 30 minutes until the hare is tender.

13. Cut the bread into heart shaped croutons and fry to a golden brown in the butter.

14. Serve the stew in the casserole garnished with the heart shaped croutons and chopped parsley.

Note: Rabbit can be used in place of hare. Allow 3 rabbits for 10 portions.

TERRINE

21. TERRINE OF GAME

10 PORTIONS

Ingredients

Pheasants                                                                1

Streaky bacon                                                      250 g

Lean Pork                                                              100 g

Veal                                                                         100 g

Pork Fat                                                                 200 g

Liver                                                                        50 g

Bay Leaf                                                                    1

Thyme                                                                   1 Sprig

Brandy                                                                   25 ml

Truffle                                                                     50 g

Salt

Pepper

Method

1. Draw the pheasant and remove the skin and bone.

2. Line the terrine dish with streaky bacon.

3. Fry the lean pork, veal and liver with the bay leaf and thyme, flame with brandy. Pass once through a mincer fitted with a coarse plate and then 4 times through a mincer fitted with a fine plate. This produces the force-meat. Cut the pork fat into lardons.

4. Place an even layer of forcemeat on the bottom of the dish. On this arrange fillets of the game meat, the lardons of pork fat and the truffle. Fill the dish with single or alternate layers finishing with a layer of forcemeat.

5. Cover the final layer of forcemeat with streaky bacon and cover the dish with a lid. Stand the dish in a try of water and cook in an oven at 180°C.

6. The time of cooking will depend on the size of the terrine but the process will be complete when the fat that rises is perfectly clear.

7. When the terrine is cooked remove it from the oven, take off the lid and allow it to cool under slight pressure.

Notes:

1. If the terrine is to be presented on a buffet, it should be removed from its container, trimmed, and the excess fat removed. Into a clean terrine pour sufficient game aspic to just cover the bottom and allow to set. Replace the terrine of game into the dish and fill with game aspic on the point of setting.

2. Partridge or hare can be used in place of pheasant. Allow either 1 hare or 2 partridges for this amount.